Staff & Board Members

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”   — Margaret Mead, Cultural Anthropologist (1901 – 1978)


NATIONAL HISTORY PROJECT STAFF

Molly Murphy MacGregor, Executive Director and Co-Founder, Chair of the NWHP Board of Directors
Molly is a former high school social studies teacher who has worked for over 35 years in the field of gender equity and women’s history. MacGregor conducts women’s history workshops and women’s historic sites tours throughout the country. She also works with state and national agencies on strategies and programs to help acknowledge and recognize the historic contributions of women. Her work in the field of multicultural women’s history has been widely recognized including awards from the National Education Association, the US Department of Education, the National Association for Multicultural Education, and the Association for Gender Equity Leadership in Education Leadership. Molly is accessible via email at ednasmolly@aol.com

Vicki Dougan, Graphic Designer and Marketing Consultant began her career as a high school English teacher in PA, and has a diverse background that includes writing newsletters, sales, promotional marketing and graphic design. For the past 14 years, she has worked closely with NWHP staff providing logo merchandise, designing the gazette and theme products, and developing brochures and related marketing materials. Vicki participated in the first Equality Day Parade in Sacramento, and is a NWHP Network Member. She is a member of Promotional Marketing Association of Northern CA, and provides consulting services to various organizations. Contact Vicki at vicki@salespromotionusa.com.

Laura Krier Web Manager
Laura Krier works as the Web Services Librarian at Sonoma State University, where she aims to inspire students to be curious lifelong learners. She has an MS in Library and Information Science from Simmons College and a BA in Literature and Women’s Studies from
UC Santa Cruz. She’s been a committed feminist as long as she can remember, and is profoundly grateful to the women’s movement for ensuring that she had to opportunity to learn about the amazing women who shaped the world throughout history. 

Leasa Graves, Coordinator for Women’s History Alliance and Archival Collection
Leasa Graves is the Lead Teacher at Youth Connections, a John Muir Charter High School Program. Her passion for history began during her middle school years when she experienced the power of knowing the past. As an undergraduate at Sonoma State University her work focused on post Civil War narratives and it was through this work that she recognized the ability to influence social advocacy through historical research. Currently a graduate student with Arizona State University she has comes to the National Women’s History Project to coordinate the Women’s History Alliance and assist with the coordination of the National Women’s History Project archival collection for Smith College.


NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY PROJECT BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Denise L. Baer, Ph.D., is a political scientist, program evaluator, scholar and consultant based in the Washington, D.C. area.  Denise holds a B.A. from the University of Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in political science from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale.  She is currently the Evaluation Officer for the Center for International Private Enterprise, and as a researcher has consulted for a number of federal agencies and non-profits, including the Institute for Women’s Policy Research and the Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital.  Denise has taught at a number of universities, including American, Georgetown, George Washington and Boston University, among others.  Her published work in American politics includes the history of the women’s movement, women’s organizations, women as leaders and public officials, the role of gender quotas, and research work on women and girls.  She began her work on public women’s history in the 1990s with the late C. DeLores Tucker on the effort to have a statue dedicated to Sojourner Truth in the U.S. Capitol, a goal achieved in 2006.  She is the founder of Herstoryhistory, a web portal designed to document how public policy can be used as a tool to ensure that the invisibility of women’s history is made visible in our collective public memory in statutes, parks, trails, museums, historic homes, research centers, archives, history and oral history projects throughout the U.S.  She is a member of the American and International Political Science Associations, the American Evaluation Association, the National Press Club and the Women’s Caucus for Political Science.  Denise is the mother of four daughters and enjoys gardening and travel, including visiting museums across the U.S. and abroad.   She can be contacted at dbaer@herstoryhistory.org

Dr. Patricia Bath is a scientist and inventor.   She was the first to invent and demonstrate laserphaco cataract surgery and was recognized as a pioneer in laser history.  Professor Bath’s road to achievement started as a teenage NSF awardee researching cancer at Yeshiva University and Harlem Hospital. She later graduated from Howard University College of Medicine in 1968 and completed ophthalmology residency and fellowships at NYU and Columbia University. In 1974 Dr. Bath moved to California accepting positions at both UCLA and Drew Universities. With her appointment at UCLA in 1974 she became the 1st woman opththalmologist on the faculty at UCLA.

She has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors and is a member of the Medical Honor Society, the AOA.  She advocates for the blind and disabled through the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness (www.blindnessprevention.org) which she co-founded. Always an advocate for the disenfranchised since her undergraduate civil rights work with Martin Luther King, Jr. and Alpha Kappa Alpha, she continues her advocacy for women’s rights.

Dr. Bath wishes to pass the torch and inspire school kids to choose careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. Women in science and medicine still face discrimination and bias not only in salary and rank but also in recognition. Just like the suffragettes who fought for voting rights Dr. Bath has committed herself to the fight for gender equity and equality for women in STEM and Medicine. She is accessible by email at sciencesuffragette@gmail.com

Siobhan Bredin is an educator, technologist, playwright, and citizen journalist in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her passion for women’s history and empowerment started in childhood when she tried to find books about women in her local library and found very few. Inspired and encouraged by her mother’s involvement in the women’s movement of the 1960’s and 70’s, Siobhan has worked for gender equity and increased opportunities through education throughout her life, both in her career and through volunteer work in the community. She is a Senior Project Director at Education Development Center, a global non-profit dedicated to improving people’s lives through education. As founder and director of Cambridge Vintage Mystery Theatre, Siobhan writes and stages plays in the style of classic radio dramas that incorporate elements of local and national history and women’s empowerment. She is a citizen journalist with Neighbormedia.org.

Robert P. J. Cooney (Advisory Board Liaison) is the author of “Winning the Vote,” a photographic history of the American woman suffrage movement. Director of the Woman Suffrage Media Project since 1993, he has spent years delving deep into the nation’s photographic archives and has also consulted on numerous documentary films, books, and special projects. Co-author with Helen Michalowski of “The Power of the People: Active Nonviolence in the United States,” Bob designed and created several publications for the National Women’s History Project including posters, timeline display sets, and the popular 1995 gazette “Women Win the Vote,” which prompted national recognition of the 75th anniversary of women winning the ballot. Cooney’s work is in the tradition of American men who have supported women’s equality and independence and works to promote the idea that women’s accomplishments are an important part of American history.

Emily  Dieker first learned of the National Women’s History Project in college when she organized campus Women’s History Month celebrations her junior and senior years. She earned a BA in Women’s Studies from Wartburg College in 2006 and a MA in Women’s Studies from the George Washington University in 2009. Emily joined the NWHP team in Fall 2012 and works closely with the Executive Director on preparing materials for Women’s History Month and long-term strategic planning. In addition to her deep love of women’s history, Emily also enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing clarinet in a community band. Emily can be reached atemdieker@gmail.com.

Nancy Rose Foye-Cox is a retired public servant in Akron, Ohio with 40 years as a victim advocate, diversity coordinator, editor, television host and communications officer in Florida, Washington DC, New Mexico, and Ohio. A past AAUW Diversity Resource Team member, she is former co-chair of the National Committee for Women of the American Society for Public Administration and a recent ASPA National Council member. A national co-founder of National Women’s History Week and Month, she co-founded the first Washington DC celebration and founded the first Florida celebration in Miami. She chaired the Broward County, Florida Women’s Hall of Fame and ASPA’s Section for Women (SWPA)  Selection and Awards Committees, respectively. Foye-Cox was the 2014 Service to SWPA Award winner. A Friend of Historic St. John’s Episcopal Church-Ohio City–’Station Hope’ on the Underground Railroad, she is an Episcopal Diocese of Ohio Council member and a motivational speaker for Juvenile Court Victim Impact Panels. She is accessible via email at nancyfoyecox@yahoo.com.

Mary Elizabeth King  went to work for the U.S. civil rights movement at the age of 22, first in Atlanta and then Mississippi, serving on the staff of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Uniquely among SNCC staff she has built her academic specialty on the study of nonviolent civil resistance and has a worldwide reputation on the subject.

Now a professor of peace and conflict studies at the UN-affiliated University for Peace (main campus Costa Rica), she is also a Distinguished Rothermere American Institute Fellow at the University of Oxford, Britain. Among her many works is Freedom Song: A Personal story of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, which won her a 1988 Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Book Award. She is the author of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr: The Power of Nonviolent Action. In a collaboration with The New York Times, she wrote a reference volume on the national nonviolent revolutions that brought about democratic transitions in the former Eastern bloc. Her latest book is Gandhian Nonviolent Struggle and Untouchability in South India: The 1924–25 Vykom Satyagraha and the Mechanisms of Change (Oxford University Press).

King served in the Carter Administration with worldwide oversight and responsibility for the Peace Corps, the domestic VISTA program, and other national volunteer service programs. For her work on nonviolent action, King has been awarded the Jamnalal Bajaj International Prize in Mumbai, the El-Hibri Peace Education Prize, and the James Lawson Award for Nonviolent Achievement. Her alma mater Ohio Wesleyan University has bestowed on her the honorary doctor of laws degree and she was elected a Fellow by Aberystwyth University, in Wales, United Kingdom — their equivalent of an honorary degree — where she did her doctoral work in international politics.

Angie Klink is a historian, advertising copywriter, and scriptwriter and author of eight books.   She writes biographies, histories, documentaries, children’s books, essays, and copy for a variety of advertising media. Klink authored three books published by Purdue University Press: The Deans’ Bible: Five Purdue Women and their Quest for Equality; Kirby’s Way: How Kirby and Caroline Risk Built their Company on Kitchen-Table Values; and Divided Paths, Common Ground: The Story of Mary Matthews and Lella Gaddis, Pioneering Purdue Women Who Introduced Science into the Home.   Two essays by Klink are featured in the book, Undeniably Indiana, published by Indiana University Press in August 2016 to commemorate Indiana’s Bicentennial. Klink authored the children’s books Purdue Pete Finds His Hammer, and I Found U and is published in four titles for the Chicken Soup for the Soul series. In December 2014, Klink appeared on C-SPAN’s Book TV discussing The Deans’ Bible. The interview is archived online in the C-SPAN Video Library. The Deans’ Bible book trailer is available on YouTube.

Klink was the scriptwriter for the public education documentary Rise Above the Mark, narrated by actor Peter Coyote. Rise Above the Mark was named an Official Selection in the 2014 Gutsy Gals Film Award competition. Deborah Hutchison, President and Founder of Gutsy Gals Inspire Me said, “Your film has helped to support our mission of promoting talented women writers and directors of film, and putting women’s creative vision front-and-center in today’s contemporary media.” www.riseabovethemark.com
Klink is the recipient of the 2016 American Advertising Federation Silver Medal Award recognizing lifetime achievement in the marketing, advertising and public relations industry. She has received fifty-seven American Advertising Federation ADDY Awards and an honorable mention in the 2007 Erma Bombeck Writers’ Competition.
Klink holds a BA from the Brian Lamb School of Communication at Purdue University. She lives in Lafayette, Indiana, with her husband, two sons, and rescue dog, Chloe. Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Pinterest.  Learn more at www.angieklink.com  She can be contacted at aklink@nlci.com

Diana Carpenter Madoshi received a Bachelor of Science Degree in nursing from Sacramento State University. She is retired after more than 30 years in nursing. For more than 20 years she has volunteered as event coordinator and planner for nonprofit programs and organizations to promote forums and conferences on issues pertinent to women. Women suffrage history has been a passion for her. She credits countless undervalued women community leaders for stroking her fire, as well her mentor women rights activist Carol Norberg who co-chaired women Women’s Equality Day parades with her. The parades and rally were organized to remind women of the sacrifices women made to get them the right to vote. Friends and colleagues refer to Diana as a “go to person” to get things done. She was a founding member and cochair of the 2011 California Women Suffrage Centennial Committee that promoted celebratory events across the state about California women winning the vote. During March Women History Month, Diana organizes and promotes programs that teach and inform the community about women history and achievements. Always, the advocate and activist, she serves on nonprofit boards like the League of Women Voters in her county and a few statewide boards. A loving mother of three and grandmother of six, she delights in reminding them that we all have a purpose and obligation to “plant seeds” for the next generation.

Molly Murphy MacGregor is President and Co-founder of the National Women’s History Project. She is a former high school social studies teacher who has worked for over 30 years in the field of gender equity and women’s history. MacGregor conducts women’s history workshops and women’s historic sites tours throughout the country. She also works with state and national agencies on strategies and programs to help acknowledge and recognize the historic contributions of women. Her work in the field of multicultural women’s history has been widely recognized including awards from the National Education Association, the US Department of Education, the National Association for Multicultural Education, and the Association for Gender Equity Leadership in Education Leadership.

Patricia Ann Pierce retired from Vanderbilt University in 2007 after a career of almost thirty years as the Senior Director of the Opportunity Development Center (ODC). She was responsible for all University and Medical Center matters related to equal opportunity and affirmative action laws, regulations, and guidelines. She designed and conducted workshops for faculty and staff on a variety of topics related to equity and diversity, and she served as a fact finder and mediator of grievances filed by faculty, staff and students. She served on the Board of Commissioners of the Tennessee Human Rights Commission and was elected three years as Board Chair. Currently she serves as a member of the Economic Council Foundation Board and Chairs the Scholarship Program, is a Board member of the Nashville Sports Council where she served on the Legacy Committee for the 2014 Women’s Final Four basketball tournament, and is Board member Emeritus for ATHENA International.

Ms. Pierce achieved outstanding success in the academic world and is recognized internationally as an advocate for diversity and equity. She has presented numerous programs on disability issues, gender issues, including sexual harassment, and cultural diversity for Nashville community organizations, and at regional, national, and international conferences. She has given her time to many organizations to help promote opportunities and advocate equity for women. She has served as a volunteer or member of thirty-four organizations, served as President or Vice President of nine organizations and served as a member of the Board of Directors of twenty organizations of which two are international organizations. She was a founding member of Women in Higher Education in Tennessee. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the Rotary International Jean Harris Award, YWCA Academy of Women of Achievement, the Women in Higher Education in Tennessee June Anderson Award, the 2003 Nashville ATHENA Award, the 2006 Tennessee Economic Council’s Excellence & Equity Award, Tennessee State University’s 2008 Woman of Legend and Merit Award, and Nashville’s largest women’s organization CABLE prestigious Molly Todd Cup which is given to a woman who spends much of her life making the world a better place to live. She is a graduate of Leadership America, Leadership Nashville, the Oxford University Roundtable, and is an inductee of the Tennessee International Women’s Forum. She was selected as one of Tennessee’s national delegates to participate in Vision 2020 Program at Drexel University. She has a BS degree from the University of Tennessee in 1973. She played basketball at UT in 1968 under Joan Cronan. She completed the Bryn Mawr University Institute for Women in Higher Education Administration and the National Institute for Leadership Development at Arizona State. She was married to the late Jacky Goss and she resides in Harriman, TN. She and Jacky have two sons and four grandchildren. She lives in the home she and her late husband built in Harriman, TN.

Kimberly Salter, Ph.D. is an Organizational Psychologist and Marriage Family Therapist in partnership with Dr. Santiago Estrada (her husband) they co-founded Santiago Estrada & Associates (S.E.A.) an employee assistance and management resource company in 1983. Kimberly has given talks and presentations on Women’s ‘Herstory’ for the past 15 years.She is past president of the California National Organization for Women and currently sits on the board of USNC for UN Women, Southern California Chapter.  Dr. Salter has facilitated many conferences, locally, statewide and nationally. She was chair of the CA NOW State Conference in 1999; co-chair of “Girls 2000: Choices and Dreams” Orange County, CA; co-chair of the 2001 Association for Women in Psychology (AWP) National Conference “Embracing Diversity: A Feminist Odyssey”; co-chair V-Day Laguna Beach 2003 and 2004; and she has appeared as Eleanor Roosevelt in “Women Making a Difference”. Kimberly has traveled around the state and the United States as a speaker, workshop presenter, and forum facilitator on subjects ranging from psychological well-being and empowerment to women’s herstory and women’s rights. She has served on many boards locally and statewide over the past 25 years and is a member of almost every progressive and feminist organization that exists. Closest to her heart (along with her husband of 24 years) are her three grandsons.

Dr. Patricia Carter “Pat” Sluby is a registered patent agent, author, and a professional genealogist, previously certified.  Dr. Sluby was awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters from her alma mater in 2015. She is a former Primary Patent Examiner and Special Programs Patent Cooperation Treaty Examiner from the US Patent and Trademark Office.   Also, she is a free-lance writer, historian, and lecturer on local history, genealogy, and inventors, often appearing on radio and television.   Dr. Sluby received her bachelor of science degree in chemistry from Virginia Union University, and pursued graduate studies at Fisk and American universities.  She accepted a chemist position at the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory of the US Geological Survey before transferring to the USPTO to its Chemical Division to examine patent applications in the fields of chemistry and chemical engineering.  
    From 1979 to 1980, Dr. Sluby was a Fellow with the Department of Commerce Science and Technology Fellowship program where she drafted a bill (H.R. 6735) while on the staff of the Domestic Monetary Policy Sub-Committee of the US House of Representatives, chaired by Congressman Parren Mitchell, and she critiqued papers at the Cultural Resources Division of the National Park Service.
    Dr. Sluby was the technical advisor to the director of the independent film From Dreams to Reality: A Tribute to Minority Inventors.  She published articles in the Journal of the Patent Office Society; Sage–A Scholarly Journal for Black Women; Bicentennial Celebration–United States Patent and Copyright Laws Proceedings, Events and Addresses; Bookmark (New York State Library).  She has published articles on tracing family history for the American Telephone and Telegraph Company.  Her articles on her own ancestors have appeared in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, the Afro-American Newspapers, Negro History Bulletin, and the Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin.  
    Dr. Sluby is the author of several books, the first titled Creativity and Inventions–The Genius of Afro-Americans and Women and their Patents, published in 1987.  Her second book The Inventive Spirit of African Americans: Patented Ingenuity was released in 2004.  Her latest title is The Entrepreneurial Spirit of African Americans, released in March 2011.
    Dr. Sluby is the immediate past president of the National Intellectual Property Law Association, an alumni member of the Jerome Lemelson Center at Smithsonian Institution, and is a member of the National Genealogical, the Afro-American Genealogical and Historical, and the Maryland Historical societies.  
    Among her many honors and awards are a Danforth Foundation Fellowship, the First Annual Norbert Rillieux Presidential award from the National Patent Law Association, and the Employee of the Year award in 1884 from the US Department of Commerce for outstanding contributions to Minority Enterprise.  
      She received the Patent and Trademark Office Commissioner’s EEO Award, and is the recipient of the Bronze Medal for superior federal government service, a recipient of a Resolution from the State of New York, and is the recipient of a proclamation from the Prince George’s (MD) County Council.  Dr. Sluby, a resident of  Maryland, is married to Paul E. Sluby, Sr., and is the mother of two daughters.

Gloria Taylor earned a bachelor’s degree from San Francisco State University and a MPH degree from the University of California at Berkeley. She spent her early career as consultant. This change allowed time for her to focus on her passion of advocating for the advancement of women and girls through her involvement in numerous women’s organizations. She has served on many Boards of Directors in the role of President, Vice President, etc. She is the immediate past co-president of the American Association of University women of California which has its mission of advancing equity for girls and women on the local, state and national levels. Gloria served as a co-chair of California’s women’s Suffrage centennial where she worked closely with the NWHP in the dissemination of information about California women’s role in the suffrage movement.

Martha Wheelock  has been passionate about celebrating women artists, authors and Women’s History in film since the mid 1970’s, when Women’s Studies programs were just starting, and there were few films in this area. Her film subjects include writers May Sarton, Madeleine L’Engle, and Kate Chopin and Photographer,  Berenice Abbott. She has celebrated our foremothers in One Fine Day and Take the Power, and the story of the Federal Suffrage Amendment in VOTES FOR WOMEN. Martha has also been an English, Ethics and Women’s Studies high school and college teacher for  47 years, and is now retired from Harvard-Westlake School to make films full time. She feels there is no end to fascinating and powerful stories about women! Currently she is creating a film honoring Women in Science — then and now. 

Margaret Zierdt (Emerita) earned a BA from Penn State University and MEds from University of Maryland and the University of Hawaii and was a public school teacher for 30 years. As a grad student in 1972 she examined sex roles in classic first grade literature and found great inequalities between female and male characters in these greatly loved stories. In a random selection of picture books published in 1970 and 1971 she found the same pattern of presenting female characters unable to solve problems. She worked on her school system’s Title IX Self-Evaluation project which documented failure to meet Title IX standards in many areas, including athletic and sports programs, enrollment of girls in math and science courses, and recruitment programs for administrative assignments. As a member of the Title IX committee, she made many recommendations to the school board to achieve compliance with Title IX rules. She participated in a statewide program for guidance counselors to promote awareness of Title IX regulations. She also taught a course for staff development on women in the western world. As a member of AAUW she has given programs and written newsletter articles on women’s history. In 1985 she researched and published a poster listing over 1000 American women of note by day of birth. This Celebrate Women poster has been updated and is carried by the NWHP.