Search results for women's equality day

Women’s Equality Day

Womens-Equality-Day

Sample Women’s Equality Day Proclamation

Many of you have asked about a Women’s Equality Day Proclamation for your community, workplace, or military base.  Please feel free to edit the following one to meet your needs. 

Proclamation Designating August 26, 2017, as Women’s Equality Day  

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have historically been treated as second-class citizens and have often  been denied the full rights and privileges, public or private, legal or institutional, which are available to male citizens of the United States; and 

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have united to assure that these rights and privileges are available to ALL citizens equally, and 

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have designated August 26, the anniversary date of the certification of the Nineteenth Amendment, which culminated a 72-year, non-violent campaign to extend the right to vote to women, as symbol of the continued fight for equal rights: and 

WHEREAS, the women of United States are to be commended and supported in their organizations and activities,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the (name of elected body or elected official or commanding officer) recognizes the commemoration of that day in 1920, on which the women of America won their right to vote, as an opportunity to continue to work for equal rights for ALL citizens.

 


 

The History of Women’s Equality Day

At the behest of Rep. Bella Abzug (D-NY), in 1971 and passed in 1973,  the U.S. Congress designated August 26 as “Women’s Equality Day.”

The date was selected to commemorate the 1920 certification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote. This was the culmination of a massive, peaceful civil rights movement by women that had its formal beginnings in 1848 at the world’s first women’s rights convention, in Seneca Falls, New York.

The observance of Women’s Equality Day not only commemorates the passage of the 19th Amendment, but also calls attention to women’s continuing efforts toward full equality. Workplaces, libraries, organizations, and public facilities now participate with Women’s Equality Day programs, displays, video showings, or other activities.

Joint Resolution of Congress, 1971
Designating August 26 of each year as Women’s Equality Day

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have been treated as second-class citizens and have not been entitled the full rights and privileges, public or private, legal or institutional, which are available to male citizens of the United States; and

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have united to assure that these rights and privileges are available to all citizens equally regardless of sex; and

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have designated August 26, the anniversary date of the certification of the Nineteenth Amendment, as symbol of the continued fight for equal rights: and

WHEREAS, the women of United States are to be commended and supported in their organizations and activities,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that August 26th of each year is designated as Women’s Equality Day, and the President is authorized and requested to issue a proclamation annually in commemoration of that day in 1920, on which the women of America were first given the right to vote, and that day in 1970, on which a nationwide demonstration for women’s rights took place.

Women’s Equality Day Brochure 

Printing instructions for Women’s Equality Day Brochure

1. Click the Women’s Equality Day Brochure link above to download the brochure (may take a few moments to load – please be patient)
2. Print page 1
3. Turn it upside down and print page 2 on the back (or copy back to back)
* Remember to turn the page upside down when copying the back to ensure proper alignment *
4. Fold paper into three parts to create a brochure.

Equality Day Celebration Resources

Ideas for Women’s Equality Day

How Women Won The Vote Gazette volume 1(downloadable)

How Women Won the Vote Gazette volume 2 (downloadable)

Additional Print & Online Woman Suffrage Resources

Read More

BDAY: Elizabeth Janeway, social analyst of 20th century women’s equality drive, wrote Man’s World, Women’s Place (1971) and Powers of the Weak (1980)

October 7, 1913 (2005)

Read More

BDAY: Sarah Grimké, outspoken abolitionist and influential women’s rights pioneer, wrote “Epistle to the Clergy of the Southern States” in 1836 refuting Biblical scripture that justified slavery, wrote “Letters on the Equality of the Sexes, and the Condition of Woman” in 1838

November 26, 1792 (1873)

Read More

2017 Presidential Women’s History Month Proclamation

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH, 2017

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

We are proud of our Nation’s achievements in promoting women’s full participation in all aspects of American life and are resolute in our commitment to supporting women’s continued advancement in America and around the world.

America honors the celebrated women pioneers and leaders in our history, as well as those unsung women heroes of our daily lives.  We honor those outstanding women, whose contributions to our Nation’s life, culture, history, economy, and families have shaped us and helped us fulfill America’s promise.

We cherish the incredible accomplishments of early American women, who helped found our Nation and explore the great western frontier.  Women have been steadfast throughout our battles to end slavery, as well as our battles abroad.  And American women fought for the civil rights of women and others in the suffrage and civil rights movements.  Millions of bold, fearless women have succeeded as entrepreneurs and in the workplace, all the while remaining the backbone of our families, our communities, and our country.

During Women’s History Month, we pause to pay tribute to the remarkable women who prevailed over enormous barriers, paving the way for women of today to not only participate in but to lead and shape every facet of American life.  Since our beginning, we have been blessed with courageous women like Henrietta Johnson, the first woman known to work as an artist in the colonies; Margaret Corbin, who bravely fought in the American Revolution; and Abigail Adams, First Lady of the United States and trusted advisor to President John Adams.

We also remember incredible women like Mary Walker, the first woman to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor; Harriet Tubman, who escaped slavery in 1849 and went on to free hundreds of others through the Underground Railroad; Susan B. Anthony, the publisher and editor of The Revolution and her friend, Dr. Charlotte Lozier, one of the first women medical doctors in the United States, both of whom advocated for the dignity and equality of women, pregnant mothers, and their children; Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat accelerated the modern civil rights movement; Shirley Temple Black, the famous actress turned diplomat and first chief of protocol for the President of the United States; Anna Bissell, the first woman CEO in American history; Amelia Earhart, the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean; Ella Fitzgerald, the First Lady of Song and the Queen of Jazz; and Sally Ride, the first American woman astronaut.

America will continue to fight for women’s rights and equality across the country and around the world.  Though poverty holds back many women, America cannot and will not allow this to persist.  We will empower all women to pursue their American dreams, to live, work and thrive in safe communities that allow them to protect and provide for themselves and their families.

America is also mindful of the fight that continues for so many women around the world, where women are often not protected and treated disgracefully as second-class citizens.  America will fight for these women too, and it will fight to protect young girls who are robbed of their rights, trafficked around the world, and exploited.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2017 as Women’s History Month.  I call upon all Americans to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand seventeen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-first.

DONALD J. TRUMP

Read More

The Women’s History Alliance

The National Women’s History Project is proud to announce the establishment of a new Women’s History Alliance, which will help link women’s history advocates at the local, state, and federal level and significantly expand each group’s circle of influence. 

Open to individuals and organizations, this new effort will help connect educators, performers, keepers of historic sites, agencies, and organizations in their work recognizing women’s history and preparing for the Woman Suffrage Centennial in 2020. 

Building on the success of Women’s History Month, the primary goal of the new Alliance is to have Women’s Equality Day—August 26th, the anniversary of American women winning the right to vote—declared a federal holiday. This will be a serious challenge, but what better way to celebrate “Women’s Independence Day” and honor the inspiring non-violent movement that overcame tremendous odds to win civil rights to American women.

Read More