Women’s Equality Day Resources

Women’s Equality Day commemorates the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, granting the right to vote to women. The amendment was first introduced in 1878. In 1971, the U.S. Congress designated August 26 as Women’s Equality Day.

 


 

SAMPLE PROCLAMATION FOR WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY

Joint Resolution of Congress, 1971
Designating August 26 of each year as Women’s Equality Day

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have been treated as second-class citizens and have not been entitled the full rights and privileges, public or private, legal or institutional, which are available to male citizens of the United States; and

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have united to assure that these rights and privileges are available to all citizens equally regardless of sex; and

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have designated August 26, the anniversary date of the certification of the Nineteenth Amendment, as symbol of the continued fight for equal rights: and

WHEREAS, the women of United States are to be commended and supported in their organizations and activities,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that August 26th of each year is designated as Women’s Equality Day, and the President is authorized and requested to issue a proclamation annually in commemoration of that day in 1920, on which the women of America were first given the right to vote, and that day in 1970, on which a nationwide demonstration for women’s rights took place.

 


 

IDEAS FOR CELEBRATING WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY

  • Join the Women’s History Alliance who will be working  over the next 4 years to have Women’s Equality Day 2020 declared a federal holiday. 

 


 

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES FOR WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY

These resources, compiled by the National Education Association, are intended to help students in grades K-12 learn about the suffrage movement in general and the 19th Amendment in particular.

  • Women Win the Vote, women’s history archive from Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities. An overview of the suffrage movement, including brief biographies of 75 Suffragists (Grades 5-8).
  • Education & Resources archive from National Women’s History Museum (NWHM). Features videos, activities, interactive lessons, and quizzes highlighting the contributions of women to the social, cultural, economic, and political life of the U.S. (Grades 6-12).
  • Women’s Suffrage: Manuscript Division from the Library of Congress. Includes papers of the movement’s early pioneers, the daughters of that first generation, the women who made the successful push to victory, and records of leading national suffrage organization (Grades 9-12).
  • Women’s Suffrage archive from the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. Six historians examine aspects of women’s efforts to gain the right to vote (Grades 9-12).

 


 

Printing instructions for Women’s Equality Day Brochure

  1. Download the brochure (may take a few moments to load – please be patient)
  2. Print page 1
  3. Turn it upside down and print page 2 on the back (or copy back to back)
  4. Fold paper into three parts to create a brochure.

 


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Posted by on Jul 18, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Ideas for Women’s Equality Day

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Posted by on Apr 7, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Honorees at awards luncheon D.C. 2016

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“Women of Substance National Women’s History Project Honors Those Who Formed a More Perfect Union” —guest post by author Angie Klink March 31st, 2016 The Hamilton Live, an event venue in Washington, D.C., assumed a vibration of a higher order on March 19, 2016. The softly lit, lower-level space located two blocks from the White House hummed with a palpable energy, and it is only when I look back on the experience that I feel fully its life-altering import. The verve that day was set high on the shoulders of history—the past stories of our nation that formed a more perfect union. And that esteemed history was entirely female. The National Women’s History Project (NWHP) hosted a luncheon to celebrate National Women’s History Month and honor sixteen women who exemplified the 2016 theme, “Working to Form a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government.” Honorees were selected from a pool of more than 70 candidates. I nominated Captain Dorothy C. Stratton, about whom I wrote in my book, The Deans’ Bible: Five Purdue Women and their Quest for Equality, published by Purdue University Press. Following a four-ballot selection process, the NWHP board of directors selected Stratton. Stratton was Purdue University’s first full-time dean of women from 1933-1942. She took a leave of absence from Purdue to serve in World War II as the director of the Women’s Reserve of the United States Coast Guard, which she ingeniously named SPARs from the coast guard motto, Semper Paratus—Latin for Always Ready. The nautical meaning of SPAR relates to a supporting beam of a ship. The coast guard women were just that—a support—as they took over the men’s stateside military jobs, so the men could go overseas for combat duty. When the war ended in 1947, 11,000 SPARs had served under Stratton’s leadership. In 2012 First Lady Michelle Obama commissioned a coast guard cutter in honor of Stratton. It was the first time in history that a Legend-class National Security Cutter was named after a woman, and the first time that a first lady sponsored a military ship. Today, the Cutter Stratton protects America’s shoreline. In the 1941 Purdue University yearbook, the Debris, Dean of Women Stratton, age forty-one, was quoted: “To be interesting, do interesting things.” Stratton lived to be 107, fully living out her mantra. She passed away in 2006. When the war ended, Stratton became the director of personnel for the International Monetary Fund. Through the 1950s, she was the executive director of the Girl Scouts of America. She then served as the representative for the International Federation of University Women at the United Nations. Stratton most certainly worked to form a more perfect union through her efforts in public service and government. Nine of the NWHP 2016 National Women’s History Month honorees are living and most attended the luncheon to accept their acclaim. Their presence and words at the podium created an atmosphere that buoyed the audience. Two of the elder honorees inched across the stage pushing walkers. We soon learned they were not frail flowers. When they spoke at the lectern, their strong voices and powerful declarations of gratitude were a juxtaposition—a lesson against judging a woman by her cover and an admonition against ageism. Honoree Sister Mary Madonna Ashton, age ninety-two, is the former Minnesota Commissioner...

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